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Theoretical Models in Biology The Origin of Life, the Immune System, and the Brain (Oxford Science Publications) by Glenn Rowe

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Published by Oxford University Press, USA .
Written in English


Book details:

The Physical Object
Number of Pages436
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7401339M
ISBN 100198596871
ISBN 109780198596875

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Models in Theoretical Biology 7 important today because the life sciences are in a phase of rapid expansion and ever increasing specialization, while at the same time biological theories and concepts This book surveys the state of the art in theoretical and computer modeling for biological sciences. Using both mathematical and stochastic computer models of biological systems, the author focuses in particular on three central topics: the origin of life, the immune system, and memory in the :// This book surveys theoretical models in three broad areas of biology (the origin of life, the immune system, and memory in the brain), introducing mathematical and (mainly) computational models that have been used to construct simulations. Most current books on theoretical biology fall intoone of two categories: (a) books that specialize in one area of biology and treat theoretical models in Theoretical Models in Biology: The Origin of Life, the Immune System, and the Brain Oxford Science Publications: : Rowe, Glenn: Libros en idiomas extranjeros

Mark Broom is a professor of mathematics at City University London. For 20 years, he has carried out mathematical research in game theory applied to biology. His major research themes include multi-player games, patterns of evolutionarily stable strategies, models of parasitic behavior (especially kleptoparasitism), the evolution of defense and signaling, and evolutionary processes on :// Mark Broom and Jan Rychtář wrote in the preface that their book ‘Game-Theoretical Models in Biology’ is an attempt to cover “the major topics of evolutionary game theory, containing both the more abstract mathematical models and a range of mathematical models of real biological situations.” I believe they achieved this goal by  › Books › Science & Math › Mathematics. Buy Game-Theoretical Models in Biology (Chapman & Hall/CRC Mathematical & Computational Biology) (Chapman & Hall/CRC Mathematical Biology Series) 1 by Broom, Mark, Rychtar, Jan (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible  › Science & Nature › Mathematics › Education. Game-Theoretical Models in Biology (Chapman & Hall/CRC Mathematical and Computational Biology) - Kindle edition by Broom, Mark, Rychtar, Jan. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Game-Theoretical Models in Biology (Chapman & Hall/CRC Mathematical and Computational Biology) › Kindle Store › Kindle eBooks › Science & Math.

  Covering the major topics of evolutionary game theory, Game-Theoretical Models in Biology presents both abstract and practical mathematical models of real biological situations. It discusses the static aspects of game theory in a mathematically rigorous way that is appealing to mathematicians. In addition, the authors explore many applications of g   演化博弈新书:Game-Theoretical Models in Biology,Game-Theoretical Models in BiologyMark Broom, Jan RychtarISBN: , , pages, CRC ng the major topics of evolutionary game theory, Game-Theoretical Models in   by mathematical models, and such models may soon become requisites for describing the behaviour of cellular networks. What this book aims to achieve Mathematical modelling is becoming an increasingly valuable tool for molecular cell biology. Con-sequently, it is important for life scientists to have a background in the relevant mathematical ~bingalls/MMSB/ The goal of this book is to search for a balance between simple and analyzable models and unsolvable models which are capable of addressing important questions such as these. Part I focusses on single-species simple models including those which have been used to predict the growth of human and animal population in the ://